Religion Remains a Strong Marker of Political Identity in U.S.

PRINCETON, NJ — Even as overall party identification trends in the U.S. have shifted over the past six and half years, the relationship between religion and party identification has remained consistent. Very religious Americans are more likely to identify with or lean toward the Republican Party and less frequently identify with or lean toward the Democratic Party, compared with those who are moderately or nonreligious.

Gallup classifies Americans as “very religious” if they say religion is an important part of their daily lives and that they attend religious services every week or almost every week. That group constituted 41% of all U.S. adults in the first half of 2014. “Nonreligious” Americans (30% of Americans in 2014) are those who say religion is not an important part of their daily lives and that they seldom or never attend religious services. The remaining group, 29%, are classified as “moderately religious.” These people say religion is important in their lives but that they do not attend services regularly, or that religion is not important but that they still attend services.

Thumbnail for 76086

Read more here: Religion Remains a Strong Marker of Political Identity in U.S.

 

About the Author

The Politisite Aggregator provides interesting articles from across the web from mainstream media, new media outlets, and interesting blog posts. Our media team chooses several articles each day that supplement the content provided by our writers. If you see an article that you think should appear on Politisite, please send us an email to albertacowpoke@gmail.com or politisite@yahoo.com

Author Archive Page

1 Comment

Post a Comment