NIH Spent Nearly $500K on Why Gay Men Get Syphilis in Peru

The National Institutes of Health has spent millions of dollars studying male sex workers in Peru, including more than $400,000 to determine why gay men get syphilis in the South American country.

“Syphilis remains an uncontrolled infectious disease globally, with high prevalence and incidence in certain high risk populations, affecting more than 20 percent of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru,” according to the grant, awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

“The incidence of syphilis in MSM in Peru is about 9 cases per 100 person-years,” it said. “We are proposing a study to improve our understanding of syphilis epidemiology and molecular biology, particularly among MSM.”

The study will “recruit a cohort of MSM and transgender persons at high risk for syphilis,” to measure incidence rates of syphilis over a two year period. Researchers will look at molecular and immunological factors for why MSM get syphilis and create a system for diagnosing and managing the sexually transmitted disease.

gay-boysThe project, “Syphilis: Translating Technology to Understand a Neglected Epidemic,” has received $464,272 since 2012.

The funding has gone to researchers at Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, a private university in Lima, Peru. The school has two other active studies from the NIH devoted to male sex workers.

Read More – NIH and Other Studies

About Albert N. Milliron 6987 Articles
Albert Milliron is the founder of Politisite. Milliron has been credentialed by most major news networks for Presidential debates and major Political Parties for political event coverage. Albert maintains relationships with the White House and State Department to provide direct reporting from the Administration’s Press team. Albert is the former Public Relations Chairman of the Columbia County Republican Party in Georgia. He is a former Delegate. Milliron is a veteran of the US Army Medical Department and worked for Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of Psychiatry.

Be the first to comment