New Hampshire Primary Exit Polling January 10, 2012

Editors note:  We can not independently confirm the results of these exit polls.  Please see our Politisite Political Projections for our view on the potential results for the New Hampshire elections.  We are also posting the results as they come in every few minutes, until the last votes are counted.

There is some reports that exit pollsters are taking surveys near or in the voting areas.  There are strict rules about where exit pollsters  are allowed to question voters at they leave the voting area. Often times these are not professional posters and are provided little instructions other than identifying and conducting surveys.  We take most exit polling worth a ‘grain of salt’.  we are providing this information because we have many readers asking for us to post what we have.  More on this issue if warranted.

Check back throughout  the night as we will expand the data as received.

What we are hearing from the field is:

  • The Economy is voters  top Worry
  • Nearly a third of voters say they are most interested in voting for a candidate who can defeat Barack Obama in a general elections
  • A candidates Personal life is less of an issue than positions on this issues.
  • About two-thirds of voters say they are happy with the Republican field despite what is being reported in the mainstream media

New Hampshire Exit Polls 2012 – NH Primary Results

The NH Press Frenzie:

Yes, the NH primary results will stir up even more press than we experienced in Iowa. CNN and FOX are geared up (to the hilt) for the event. Newspapers, magazines, blogs, and websites will all be covering the election in detail.

7:12 pm – Early exit polls differentiate Iowa and NH

REGISTERED INDEPENDENTS: Voters who are registered as independents or who have not chosen a party made up more than 4 in 10 voters this time around compared to about a third in 2008. Unaffiliated voters in New Hampshire can choose to participate in either party’s primary; there is not a contested Democratic primary this year.

VIEWS OF OBAMA: Voters expressed deep opposition to President Barack Obama. Overall, about 8 in 10 said they were dissatisfied with the president’s policies, including 4 in 10 who described themselves as “angry.”

AD WARS: Most New Hampshire voters said campaign advertising was not a major factor in their vote. Voters were divided on which candidate ran the most unfair campaign, with Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich near the top of that list.

CNN Comments on Exit Polls

6:37 p.m. ET – According to CNN New Hampshire Exit Polls: Just as in Iowa, nearly half the voters in New Hampshire’s Republican primary (46%) didn’t make up their minds until the final few days of the contest, and roughly 1 in 5 didn’t decide on a candidate until Election Day, according to early CNN exit polls.

What helped those late deciders make their presidential picks? One big factor, as it’s been all year, may have been the presidential debates – two of them held in New Hampshire within the race’s final three days. More than 4 in 5 of New Hampshire’s GOP primary voters say those races were an important to their vote today.

6:31 p.m. ET – Gingrich, who has taken issue with attack ads backed by a pro-Romney super PAC, said he hopes ads from a super PAC backing his candidacy are “accurate.”

“[I] hope they’re clear about what the facts are, that’s a key part of this,” Gingrich said on CNN’s “John King, USA.”

6:29 p.m. ET – Gingrich called into question Romney’s judgment, character and values while discussing his past as CEO of Bain Capital during an interview with CNN Chief National Correspondent John King Tuesday.

6:24 p.m. ET@crowleyCNN: Bipartisanship pic. Romneyite heavyweight B. Ginsberg w/ fmr. Gore camp. mgr& lifetime dem D. Brazile-sporting Romney volunteer pass

6:21 p.m. ET – According to CNN New Hampshire Exit Polls: Last week, 83% of caucus voters described themselves as conservative; 47% said they were “very conservative.” Today, just over half the New Hampshire Republican primary voters in early CNN exit polls (54%) call themselves conservative, and just 21% fall in the “very conservative” category – raising the question of whether the “Massachusetts moderate” attack Newt Gingrich debuted in Iowa might do quite the same damage to Mitt Romney in a contest where roughly three times as many voters describe themselves as moderate or liberal.

via Live blog of the New Hampshire primary – CNN Political Ticker – Blogs.

What the political pundits are saying about NH Primary results:

Ewen MacAskill of the Guardian:
Paul is looking for a strong second place finish but it does not really matter that much to him. He has no chance of winning the Republican nomination, being too far on the party fringes. His strategy is a long-term one, taking advantage of the Republican switch to proportional representation by picking up a share of delegates in each state. He has the money, the organisation and a fervent band of supporters in each state to fight a protracted campaign.

Richard Cohen for the Washington Post:
Mitt Romney will win the New Hampshire primary, but not with anything like the nearly 40 percent that he’s been getting in the latest polls. I think 30 percent will be more like it, maybe even the 25 percent that he was getting in all the Iowa polls and that he wound up with in the end. He wins, but he doesn’t kill.

Jennifer Rubin , also for WashPo:
Romney is a shoe-in to win with over 37 to 40 percent of the vote. Paul will finish in second in the low 20’s or high teens. On the strength of non-Republican voters, Huntsman will come in third. Santorum (on the strength of his debate performances) is likely to edge out Gingrich for fourth. Perry will end up sixth in low single digits and make his last stand in South Carolina. The lemming pundits will describe the results as either disappointing for Romney, a comedown for Santorum or the beginning of a Huntsman surge (maybe all three). None of these will be true.

Patrick O’Connor for WSJ:
Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. has gone all in on New Hampshire, with more than 170 appearances since spring, and is showing signs of late life in the polls. But his mixed message—Is he a moderate, appealing to independents, or a bedrock conservative?—has left many Republicans confused. A back-in-the-pack showing would add to doubts about his chances in other states

via New Hampshire Exit Polls 2012

New Hampshire Primary Exit Poll Results. The Republican Presidential Primary in New Hampshire is going on now. These are the early New Hampshire Primary Election Results. Ron Paul and Mitt Romney are in first and second in the New Hampshire Primary. Results are from Today Jan 10, 2012. Todays Republican Election Results from New Hampshire.

We continue to monitor the election in New Hampshire and have the result from early voting in the primary of January 10, 2012 Republican Primary. These are the results of 1098 voters as they entered and exited the polls in several of the over 300 locations across New Hampshire where primary voting is going on right now. We will update these results this evening and bring you more coverage of Today’s Jan 10, 2012 New Hampshire Primary and the results. Who is the winner? Ron Paul, Mitt Romney or will a surprise candidate like Newt Gingrich come out of no where and win.

via New Hampshire 2012 Primary Jan 10 2012 Exit Poll Results – YouTube.


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