Which States Will Gain or Lose Seats in Congress

Just as we reported in September based on some raw data figures, The Northeast and Midwest would lose House seats while the South and Southwest would gains.

Census Announces List of States’ Congressional Seat Gains/Losses

The Census Bureau just completed its one duty specifically described in the Constitution — to count the number of people living in the United States and apportion them to determine how many Congressional seats go to each state.

Here’s the breakdown of the 18 states which gained or lost seats.

GAINS:

Arizona +1

Florida +2

Georgia +1

Nevada +1

South Carolina +1

Texas +4

Utah +1

Washington +1

LOSSES:

Illinois -1

Iowa -1

Louisiana: -1

Massachusetts -1

Michigan -1

Missouri -1

New Jersey -1

New York -2

Ohio -2

Pennsylvania -1

via The American Spectator : AmSpecBlog : Census Announces List of States’ Congressional Seat Gains/Losses.

The Census Bureau rearranged the country’s political map on Tuesday, giving more Congressional seats to the South and the West, and taking away from the Northeast and the Midwest. The state population counts are the first results released from the 2010 Census, and are used to reapportion seats in Congress, and, in turn, the Electoral College.

The United State population grew to 308,745,538 over the last decade, an increase of 9.7 percent, the slowest rate of growth since 1940.

See the data and full story at  Which States Will Gain or Lose Seats in Congress

10 states will lose districtsMost states that will lose districts are in the Midwest and the East; New York and Ohio will lose two districts each.

STATE POPULATION
(Change since 2000)
SEATS
(Change)
Illinois 12,830,632 3.3% 18 –1 D
Iowa 3,046,355 4.1% 4 –1
Louisiana 4,533,372 1.4% 6 –1 S
Massachusetts 6,547,629 3.1% 9 –1 D
Michigan 9,883,640 -0.6% 14 –1 R
Missouri 5,988,927 7.0% 8 –1 S
New Jersey 8,791,894 4.5% 12 –1 C
New York 19,378,102 2.1% 27 –2 S
Ohio 11,536,504 1.6% 16 –2 R
Pennsylvania 12,702,379 3.4% 18 –1 R

32 states will have the same number of districtsFor the first time since 1920, California will not gain any districts.

STATE POPULATION
(Change since 2000)
SEATS
(Change)
Alabama 4,779,736 7.5% 7 +0 R
Alaska 710,231 13.3% 1 +0 1
Arkansas 2,915,918 9.1% 4 +0 D
California 37,253,956 10.0% 53 +0 C
Colorado 5,029,196 16.9% 7 +0 S
Connecticut 3,574,097 4.9% 5 +0 D
Delaware 897,934 14.6% 1 +0 1
Hawaii 1,360,301 12.3% 2 +0 C
Idaho 1,567,582 21.1% 2 +0 C
Indiana 6,483,802 6.6% 9 +0 R
Kansas 2,853,118 6.1% 4 +0 R
Kentucky 4,339,367 7.4% 6 +0 S
Maine 1,328,361 4.2% 2 +0 R
Maryland 5,773,552 9.0% 8 +0 D
Minnesota 5,303,925 7.8% 8 +0 S
Mississippi 2,967,297 4.3% 4 +0 S
Montana 989,415 9.7% 1 +0 1
Nebraska 1,826,341 6.7% 3 +0 *
New Hampshire 1,316,470 6.5% 2 +0 S
New Mexico 2,059,179 13.2% 3 +0 S
North Carolina 9,535,483 18.5% 13 +0 R‡
North Dakota 672,591 4.7% 1 +0 1
Oklahoma 3,751,351 8.7% 5 +0 R
Oregon 3,831,074 12.0% 5 +0 S
Rhode Island 1,052,567 0.4% 2 +0 D
South Dakota 814,180 7.9% 1 +0 1
Tennessee 6,346,105 11.5% 9 +0 R
Vermont 625,741 2.8% 1 +0 1
Virginia 8,001,024 13.0% 11 +0 S
West Virginia 1,852,994 2.5% 3 +0 D
Wisconsin 5,686,986 6.0% 8 +0 R
Wyoming 563,626 14.1% 1 +0 1
8 states will gain districts
STATE POPULATION
(Change since 2000)
SEATS
(Change)
Arizona 6,392,017 24.6% 9 +1 C
Florida 18,801,310 17.6% 27 +2 R
Georgia 9,687,653 18.3% 14 +1 R
Nevada 2,700,551 35.1% 4 +1 S
South Carolina 4,625,364 15.3% 7 +1 R
Texas 25,145,561 20.6% 36 +4 R
Utah 2,763,885 23.8% 4 +1 R
Washington 6,724,540 14.1% 10 +1 C

Related Stories:
2010 Census: South, West will Gain House Seats and Electroral Votes
GOP Gains at Least 680 State Legislative Seats, says NCSL’s Bipartisan Analysis

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